#transparency

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9 11, 2022

PAYMENT26

2022-11-09T12:46:45-05:00November 9th, 2022|1- Financial Services Management|

Master-Account Transparency

Although the Fed characterized its final payment-system access guidelines as “transparent,” FedFin’s analysis and other assessments concluded that the Federal Reserve Banks retained considerable discretion to pick and choose those granted master accounts and there would be no ready way to identify which institutions had or lost this essential status for any provider of retail or wholesale deposit-taking services or their equivalent.  The Board is now seeking to counter criticism with a revision to the guideline obliging Reserve Banks to create a quarterly list of institutions holding or ceasing to hold master-account privileges.

PAYMENT26.pdf

7 11, 2022

DAILY110722

2022-11-07T17:22:53-05:00November 7th, 2022|2- Daily Briefing|

Toomey Calls for More Fed Transparency

Sen. Toomey (R-PA) continued Republican demands for still more Fed transparency, sharply criticizing the Fed’s Friday proposal to provide some transparency into which institutions are granted master accounts.

Sweeping CFPB Fee Restrictions Now Effective

The Federal Register today includes the CFPB’s circular on Unanticipated Overdraft Fee Assessment Practices and a bulletin now effective on Unfair Returned Deposited Item Fee Assessment Practices.

CFPB Advances Bigtech Market Power Campaign

Continuing its campaign against bigtech’s market power, the Federal Register today includes the CFPB’s notice and request for comment on what fees bigtech payment operators levy on users for violations of acceptable use policies and whether their policies include provisions to restrict user platform access.

Fed Staff Paper Tries To Gauge Social Welfare Impact Of Liquidity, Capital Regs

A new Fed staff study attempts to lay out the social costs and benefits of large-bank liquidity and capital regulation.

Warren Continues Campaign Against Wells Fargo, Zelle

Sen. Warren (D-MA) today continued her campaign against Zelle by sending letters to its parent company and Wells Fargo, taking particular aim at what she deems the latter’s failure to provide adequate claims and reimbursement data and labelling responses to previous letters “insulting.”

Warren Denounces Fed “Culture of Corruption”

Sen. Warren (D-MA) today also continued her campaign against Chairman Powell, sending him a letter alleging “another set of egregious and embarrassing ethics breaches.”

Daily110722.pdf

24 10, 2022

Karen Petrou: Insider Trading, Insider Talking, and the Consequences of Outsider Wrath

2022-10-24T10:53:08-04:00October 24th, 2022|The Vault|

There’s no question that the 2008 crisis was a bit of an embarrassment to everyone in charge no matter what all their memoirs since have said.  However, the actual global financial cataclysm was nothing to U.S. voters compared to the torrent of furious protest sparked by Treasury’s maladroit decision to allow top executives at AIG to keep munificent pay raises even though many of them presided over and profited by actions that prompted well over $100 billion in taxpayer bailouts.  So it is with the Fed.  The looming battle over its billions to big finance companies is, as I detailed last week, a serious structural challenge.  But the combination of continuing official trading conflicts and new revelations about closed-door meetings is a lot easier to understand and thus a political killer with immediate consequences for Fed governance when Congress gets around to thinking about things other than itself.

Elizabeth Warren’s already on it.  Many will follow her lead not only because they often do, but also because this time she’s mostly right.  Even if she weren’t, most people will understand why she was upset by Fed “insider” trading and now by a whole lot of insider talking.

That the St. Louis Fed only says that it needs to “rethink” its policy just throws salt in this gaping political wound.  Saying also that the Bank’s president went without compensation to discuss monetary policy behind doors controlled by one of the giant companies it supervises doesn’t come close to countering …

24 10, 2022

M102422

2022-10-24T10:52:26-04:00October 24th, 2022|6- Client Memo|

 Insider Trading, Insider Talking, and the Consequences of Outsider Wrath

There’s no question that the 2008 crisis was a bit of an embarrassment to everyone in charge no matter what all their memoirs since have said.  However, the actual global financial cataclysm was nothing to U.S. voters compared to the torrent of furious protest sparked by Treasury’s maladroit decision to allow top executives at AIG to keep munificent pay raises even though many of them presided over and profited by actions that prompted well over $100 billion in taxpayer bailouts.  So it is with the Fed.  The looming battle over its billions to big finance companies is, as I detailed last week, a serious structural challenge.  But the combination of continuing official trading conflicts and new revelations about closed-door meetings is a lot easier to understand and thus a political killer with immediate consequences for Fed governance when Congress gets around to thinking about things other than itself.

M102422.pdf

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