#NSFR

22 01, 2024

DAILY012224

2024-01-22T16:57:16-05:00January 22nd, 2024|2- Daily Briefing|

FRB Reconsiders Interchange-Fee Cuts

Bowing to critics in the banking industry and on the Board, the Federal Reserve today extended the comment period on its debit-card interchange fee proposal (see FSM report INTERCHANGE12) by a surprisingly-long ninety days to May 12.  The extension is in part due to the Board’s decision to publish additional interchange fee cap data which may have persuaded the Board that the initial data analysis supporting a mandatory pricing reduction was incorrect.

OIG Finds Reserve-Bank Trades Legal, But Problematic

The Federal Reserve’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG) today released long-awaited reviews of personal trades by former Dallas and Boston Reserve Bank Presidents two years ago that raised numerous and often vociferous assertions of conflicts of interest.  Indeed, Sen. Warren (D-MA) stated that she believed these epitomized a “culture of corruption” at the Fed, introducing bipartisan legislation to force considerably more transparency at the Reserve Banks.

FSB Plans Global Run-Risk Buffers

The head of the Financial Stability Board, Secretary General John Schindler, today briefed media on the global regulator’s plans to brief the G20 in October about viral-run risk and the standards needed to avert it.  Mr. Schindler said little about what the FSB is likely to propose although the Basel Committee is now considering rewrites to global LCR and NSFR standards likely to be reflected in the FSB’s recommendations.

Daily012224.pdf

1 12, 2023

DAILY120123

2023-12-01T16:39:15-05:00December 1st, 2023|2- Daily Briefing|

Barr Outlines Rationale for LCR, NSFR Rewrite

FRB Vice Chair Barr today reiterated his views that banks must be much better prepared to use the Fed discount-window, this time emphasizing that operational readiness entails regular testing of actual transactions at regular intervals as well as robust collateral pre-positioning.

Reed Presses Synthetic-Securitization Controls

Following his comments at recent hearings (see Client Report REFORM229), Sen. Reed (D-RI) late yesterday sent a letter to FRB Vice Chair Barr, FDIC Chair Gruenberg, and Acting Comptroller Hsu urging them to evaluate CRT transaction risk on financial stability grounds and, should they find an uptick in synthetic securitizations, request public comment on possible remedies to the risks Sen. Reed identifies.

Pending Veto, House Votes Against CFPB

As anticipated (see Client Report CONSUMER53), the House today voted 221 to 202 to authorize Congressional Review Act withdrawal of the CFPB’s small business reporting rule.

OCC Readies Research for Liquidity-Reg Rewrite

Likely readying itself for the raft of new liquidity proposals presaged in Michael Barr’s talk earlier today, the OCC today issued a call for papers on depositor behavior, bank liquidity, and run risk.

Daily120123.pdf

6 10, 2023

FedFin Assessment: Basel Lays Big Plans for Basel V

2023-10-06T14:47:18-04:00October 6th, 2023|The Vault|

As we noted yesterday, the Basel Committee’s October meeting concluded not only with plans for new disclosure consultations, but also a report on lessons learned from the 2023 crisis.  We have long considered the “end-game” standards so substantive as to constitute Basel IV; now, as this report details, Basel is laying plans for Basel V via new liquidity, interest-rate, capital, and structural changes to the current construct.  We thus focus on the supervisory and regulatory action steps Basel posits as necessary responses to the financial-market volatility sparked earlier this year by SVB, SBNY, FRC, and CS’s failures.  While Basel states that none of its recommendations necessarily presages near-term global standards, …

The full report is available to retainer clients. To find out how you can sign up for the service, click here and here.…

6 10, 2023

REFORM228

2023-10-06T11:45:12-04:00October 6th, 2023|5- Client Report|

FedFin Assessment: Basel Lays Big Plans for Basel V

As we noted yesterday, the Basel Committee’s October meeting concluded not only with plans for new disclosure consultations, but also a report on lessons learned from the 2023 crisis.  We have long considered the “end-game” standards so substantive as to constitute Basel IV; now, as this report details, Basel is laying plans for Basel V via new liquidity, interest-rate, capital, and structural changes to the current construct.  We thus focus on the supervisory and regulatory action steps Basel posits as necessary responses to the financial-market volatility sparked earlier this year by SVB, SBNY, FRC, and CS’s failures.  While Basel states that none of its recommendations necessarily presages near-term global standards, they warrant review not only as likely precursors to at least some new proposals, but also as guides to what is top of mind for national regulators beyond finalizing end-game capital rules and dealing with home-country matters such as resolvability.  If Basel proposes only some of the regulatory revisions it has in mind or, as the Fed clearly intends, the U.S. does so ahead of time, larger banks will face significant revisions to the LCR and NSFR, capital add-ons for interest-rate outliers, and express ring-fencing to prevent a CS repeat – i.e., a case in which the parent company met applicable standards but key subsidiaries fell far short.

REFORM228.pdf

7 07, 2022

CRYPTO29

2023-01-24T15:33:50-05:00July 7th, 2022|1- Financial Services Management|

Global Standards for Bank Cryptoasset Exposures

Global banking regulators are trying a new, but still stringent, approach to governing bank exposures to certain types of crypto assets, revising an initial consultation to focus more on supervisory limitations than on extremely punitive capital requirements for what are deemed to be lower risk cryptoassets.  Under the new approach, it will be easier for banks to offer, facilitate, or otherwise enable tokenized forms of traditional assets without disproportionately-costly capital charges as long as an array of risk-mitigation restrictions are met.  Higher-risk cryptoassets would come under exposure limits as well as costly capital requirements, although the new consultation does permit these to be reduced via various hedging methods that might make such stablecoins viable products in certain circumstances.

CRYPTO29.pdf

29 09, 2021

Daily092921

2023-07-31T15:54:12-04:00September 29th, 2021|2- Daily Briefing|

HFSC Yellen, Powell Hearing Sure to be More than Lively
Although the HFSC Democratic staff memo suggests tomorrow’s hearing with Chair Powell and Secretary Yellen will focus on pandemic-relief programs, we expect it instead to devolve to the kind of heated debate evident at yesterday’s Senate Banking session (see Client Report REFORM208).

Global Supervisors Renew Demand for Bigtech Standards
The BIS’s Financial Supervisory Institute (FSI) today issued its latest bigtech assessment. Largely a survey of global actions, it concludes that competition (i.e., antitrust) policy is the focus of recent efforts in most surveyed nations.

Basel Capital, Liquidity Compliance Gaps Grew in 2020
In its latest monitoring report, the Basel Committee finds a significant jump to 2.9 percent from 1.8 percent in the amount of capital the largest banks need to comply with the final Basel III/IV framework. This is, Basel says, attributable to some significant outlier banks along with capital relief during the 2020 pandemic.

Daily092921.pdf

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