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6 12, 2023

DAILY120623

2023-12-06T16:42:25-05:00December 6th, 2023|2- Daily Briefing|

OFR Sees Heightened Systemic Risk

Striking a considerably more somber note than the FRB (see Client Report SYSTEMIC97), OFR today concluded that systemic risk is elevated due to an upcoming economic slowdown, heightened inflation,  and geopolitical risk and global conflict.

OCC Cracks Down on BNPL Finance

Reflecting continuing CFPB concerns about buy-now/pay-later finance, the OCC today sets new risk-management standards for federally-chartered entities in this arena.

HFSC Housing Subcommittee Revisits Housing Debate

Today’s HFSC Housing Subcommittee hearing largely followed the staff memo’s outlined political playbook, with Chairman Davidson (R-OH) calling for market-based solutions and Ranking Member Presley (D-MA) arguing that expanded subsidies are necessary alongside zoning reform to make housing affordable.

Fed Proposes Market-Risk Valuation Reporting

Readying disclosures for the market-risk capital rewrite (see FSM Report CAPITAL233), the Federal Reserve has proposed new reporting standards that would require covered banks to disclose valuations of their covered positions taking into account unearned credit spreads, close-out costs, early termination costs, investing and funding costs, liquidity, and model risk.

Fed Proposes New Liquidity Risk Reporting Standards

Reflecting growing fears that banks could not actually monetize HQLAs under stress as proved the case for Credit Suisse, the FRB is also proposing new reporting standards requiring covered companies to report on qualifying master netting agreement compliance with current liquidity-risk measurement standards.

Daily120623.pdf

6 10, 2023

FedFin Assessment: Basel Lays Big Plans for Basel V

2023-10-06T14:47:18-04:00October 6th, 2023|The Vault|

As we noted yesterday, the Basel Committee’s October meeting concluded not only with plans for new disclosure consultations, but also a report on lessons learned from the 2023 crisis.  We have long considered the “end-game” standards so substantive as to constitute Basel IV; now, as this report details, Basel is laying plans for Basel V via new liquidity, interest-rate, capital, and structural changes to the current construct.  We thus focus on the supervisory and regulatory action steps Basel posits as necessary responses to the financial-market volatility sparked earlier this year by SVB, SBNY, FRC, and CS’s failures.  While Basel states that none of its recommendations necessarily presages near-term global standards, …

The full report is available to retainer clients. To find out how you can sign up for the service, click here and here.…

6 10, 2023

REFORM228

2023-10-06T11:45:12-04:00October 6th, 2023|5- Client Report|

FedFin Assessment: Basel Lays Big Plans for Basel V

As we noted yesterday, the Basel Committee’s October meeting concluded not only with plans for new disclosure consultations, but also a report on lessons learned from the 2023 crisis.  We have long considered the “end-game” standards so substantive as to constitute Basel IV; now, as this report details, Basel is laying plans for Basel V via new liquidity, interest-rate, capital, and structural changes to the current construct.  We thus focus on the supervisory and regulatory action steps Basel posits as necessary responses to the financial-market volatility sparked earlier this year by SVB, SBNY, FRC, and CS’s failures.  While Basel states that none of its recommendations necessarily presages near-term global standards, they warrant review not only as likely precursors to at least some new proposals, but also as guides to what is top of mind for national regulators beyond finalizing end-game capital rules and dealing with home-country matters such as resolvability.  If Basel proposes only some of the regulatory revisions it has in mind or, as the Fed clearly intends, the U.S. does so ahead of time, larger banks will face significant revisions to the LCR and NSFR, capital add-ons for interest-rate outliers, and express ring-fencing to prevent a CS repeat – i.e., a case in which the parent company met applicable standards but key subsidiaries fell far short.

REFORM228.pdf

3 04, 2023

REFORM219

2023-04-03T11:07:12-04:00April 3rd, 2023|5- Client Report|

FedFin Forecast: Probable Changes to Bank Supervision, Regulation, Law

With Thursday’s White House announcement, we know that the Administration will do its best to support Fed and FDIC efforts to color recent events as a failure of Republican-led rulemaking, not also one of agency supervisory acumen, speed, and even competence.  So far, key Democrats are instead pursuing a two-track strategy:  complaining mightily about Trump-era rules but also joining with Republicans to cite an array of supervisory lapses they want quickly remediated by new standards, new rules, and – if need be – also by new law.  Indeed, on Friday, Democrats made it clear that they want considerably more from the Administration than the fixes on which the agencies prefer to focus.  Given how much is in motion and how much could advance, this report details FedFin’s forecast for near-term action in each of these arenas, focusing on matters with broad industry impact rather than specific SVB/Signature- enforcement issues.  We thus provide forecast for immediate supervisory actions, those Congress will demand, new rules (tailoring and beyond), and the few legislative initiatives we believe have a reasonable chance of passage and Presidential approval.

REFORM219.pdf

20 03, 2023

FedFin Analysis: Possible Cures for a Viral Run

2023-03-20T16:12:34-04:00March 20th, 2023|The Vault|

Among the most vexing issues in the wake of SVB’s failure is the extent to which social media may have led to the first “viral run,” a run akin to the meme-stock volatility that lead the SEC and others to fear a new form of “flash-crash” risk.  In this report, we assess current policy options related to deposit runs resulting from social media, an issue cited frequently by HFSC Chairman McHenry (R-NC) as a top priority as he begins work on post-SVB financial standards.  We note some remedies – e.g., a ban on deposit-related communication were they permissible under various constitutional and statutory free-speech edicts.

The full report is available to retainer clients. To find out how you can sign up for the service, click here and here.…

20 03, 2023

LIQUIDITY33

2023-03-20T16:12:26-04:00March 20th, 2023|5- Client Report|

FedFin Analysis: Possible Cures for a Viral Run

Among the most vexing issues in the wake of SVB’s failure is the extent to which social media may have led to the first “viral run,” a run akin to the meme-stock volatility that lead the SEC and others to fear a new form of “flash-crash” risk.  In this report, we assess current policy options related to deposit runs resulting from social media, an issue cited frequently by HFSC Chairman McHenry (R-NC) as a top priority as he begins work on post-SVB financial standards.  We note some remedies – e.g., a ban on deposit-related communication were they permissible under various constitutional and statutory free-speech edicts.  In this report, we thus assess tools more readily at hand that federal regulators might deploy now that social media’s destabilizing impact has been recognized, noting the challenges of forestalling runs without at the same time providing opinions on individual banking organizations or issuing preemptive systemic protections that would have the effect of eliminating deposit-insurance limits.  This report will thus also assess other options, including standards prohibiting deposit-related “exclusivity” requirements, dedicated Fed liquidity facilities, and revisions to the liquidity rules.  Options to revise FDIC coverage to address this risk through structural changes to coverage thresholds will be detailed in a forthcoming Petrou op-ed.

LIQUIDITY33.pdf

17 03, 2023

FedFin Assessment: Future of U.S. Bank Capital, Liquidity, Structural Regulation

2023-03-17T16:50:38-04:00March 17th, 2023|The Vault|

In this report, we continue our policy postmortem of SVB/SBNY and, now, so much more.  Prior reports have assessed the overall political context (see Client Report RESOLVE49) and likely changes to FDIC insurance (see Client Report DEPOSITINSURANCE118), with a forthcoming Petrou op-ed in Barron’s focusing on specific ways to reform federal deposit insurance to protect only the innocent.  In this report, we look at some key regulatory changes likely as the banking agencies reevaluate the regional-bank capital, liquidity, and the IDI/BHC construct.  As noted in our initial assessment and thereafter, we do not expect meaningful legislative action on the Warren, et. al. bill to repeal “tailoring” requirements, but we do expect bipartisan political pressure not just for supervisory accountability (see another forthcoming report), but also regulatory revisions.

The full report is available to retainer clients. To find out how you can sign up for the service, click here and here.…

17 03, 2023

REFORM216

2023-03-17T14:27:00-04:00March 17th, 2023|5- Client Report|

FedFin Assessment:  Future of U.S. Bank Capital, Liquidity, Structural Regulation

In this report, we continue our policy postmortem of SVB/SBNY and, now, so much more.  Prior reports have assessed the overall political context (see Client Report RESOLVE49) and likely changes to FDIC insurance (see Client Report DEPOSITINSURANCE118), with a forthcoming Petrou op-ed in Barron’s focusing on specific ways to reform federal deposit insurance to protect only the innocent.  In this report, we look at some key regulatory changes likely as the banking agencies reevaluate the regional-bank capital, liquidity, and the IDI/BHC construct.  As noted in our initial assessment and thereafter, we do not expect meaningful legislative action on the Warren, et. al. bill to repeal “tailoring” requirements, but we do expect bipartisan political pressure not just for supervisory accountability (see another forthcoming report), but also regulatory revisions.  While Republicans strongly opposed tougher capital rules when Chairman Powell appeared before them just last week (see Client Report FEDERALRESERVE73), we expect them now only to make token statements of concern about any changes that do not adversely affect smaller banking organizations.  In addition to looking at specific regulatory rewrites, this report assesses timing, noting in particular how the pending end-game rules could serve as the vehicle for changes the agencies hope to muster quickly in order to minimize demands for structural change to their own powers.

REFORM216.pdf

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