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5 10, 2022

DAILY100522

2022-10-05T16:59:59-04:00October 5th, 2022|2- Daily Briefing|

GOP Demands AG’s CBDC Ruling

HFSC Republicans today sent a letter to Attorney General Merrick Garland demanding a copy of the DoJ’s assessment on whether legislation is necessary to issue a CBDC required and due on September 5 by the President’s crypto executive order (see Client Report CRYPTO26).  Citing both Congress’ exclusive authority to coin money and Chairman Powell’s (see Client Report FEDERALRESERVE71) and Vice Chair Brainard’s (see Client Report CBDC13) ambiguous discussion of what constitutes CBDC “approval,” the Republicans reiterate that the Fed does not have the authority to issue a CBDC under current law.

Basel Blesses Counter-Cyclical Buffers

Following the FSB’s directive, the Basel Committee today issued a newsletter on counter-cyclical capital buffers (CCyBs) and a detailed report on capital and liquidity buffers.  The FSB has posited that one reason for both bank resilience and pandemic-related credit shortages was the unwillingness of banks to dip into buffers.  As we noted recently, Treasury Under Secretary Liang praised CCyBs and Basel’s newsletter reaches the same conclusion.  However, the detailed report finds that CCyB release had a weaker, albeit discernible, effect than express regulatory decisions to allow banks to use their capital buffers.

Daily100522.pdf

26 09, 2022

Karen Petrou: Nonbanks Win Big

2022-09-27T10:49:12-04:00September 26th, 2022|The Vault|

As our in-depth reports detailed, Treasury took the President’s policy edicts to heart when crafting a new digital-finance policy for the U.S.  Treasury could have ducked some hard decisions via laudatory rhetoric, but it chose instead to recommend specific policies that cut a new path to a U.S. CBDC and crypto regulation.  Our reports detail key policy decisions and what’s soon to be done with them, but one warrants even more immediate attention:  Treasury’s decision to adhere not just to the President’s executive order on crypto-finance, but also to another on increasing financial sector competition.  This puts banks on notice that not all have yet taken.

Overlooked in much analysis of Treasury’s sweeping reports is its call to break up what Treasury clearly sees as the monopoly banks have long enjoyed over payment-system access.  Treasury for example argues that many banks have exited retail remittances even though these are critical to financial inclusion and leaves the market ill-served.  Indeed, it wants nonbanks to obtain overall instant-payment access, saying:

Network effects support the adoption of instant payment systems: Widespread use makes it more likely that a payor can use an instant payment system to make a payment to a payee, increasing the system’s value. …  Broadening the range of financial institutions that are eligible to participate in instant payment systems, as certain foreign jurisdictions have done, could help to enhance speed and efficiency, competition, and inclusion in payments, including for cross-border payments.

The problem with Treasury’s call for payment-system …

26 09, 2022

M092622

2022-09-27T10:49:36-04:00September 26th, 2022|6- Client Memo|

Nonbanks Win Big

As our in-depth reports detailed, Treasury took the President’s policy edicts to heart when crafting a new digital-finance policy for the U.S.  Treasury could have ducked some hard decisions via laudatory rhetoric, but it chose instead to recommend specific policies that cut a new path to a U.S. CBDC and crypto regulation.  Our reports detail key policy decisions and what’s soon to be done with them, but one warrants even more immediate attention:  Treasury’s decision to adhere not just to the President’s executive order on crypto-finance, but also to another on increasing financial sector competition.  This puts banks on notice that not all have yet taken.

m092622.pdf

20 09, 2022

SANCTION19

2022-10-12T17:09:15-04:00September 20th, 2022|5- Client Report|

Senate Banking Questions Sanctions Impact

Today’s Senate Banking hearing on Russian sanctions showcased bipartisan concern that anti-Russian sanctions have yet to have meaningful impact and doubts about the extent to which oil-price caps will reverse this. Ranking Member Toomey (R-PA), joined by Sen. Van Hollen (D-MD), have thus introduced a measure to mandate secondary sanctions on financial institutions involved in a transaction with Russian oil above the price cap.

SANCTION19.pdf

16 09, 2022

DAILY091622

2022-10-13T10:14:58-04:00September 16th, 2022|2- Daily Briefing|

Treasury Presses For CBDC, Fast Payments With Nonbank Access

We will shortly provide clients with an in-depth analysis of each of the Administration’s policy-setting crypto reports, but draw your attention now to key payment-system recommendations.

Treasury Presses Crypto Reg Framework, New Role for CFPB

Continuing our series on the Administration’s crypto policy reports, we turn now to the paper on overall cryptoasset regulation.

Administration Also Plans Focus on Crypto Crime, Market Risk

In addition to the reports assessed in earlier alerts on CBDC, the payments system, and cryptoasset regulation, the administration today released numerous other digital asset policy actions.

Warren Demands Treasury Address Crypto’s Financial Stability, Sanctions Risk

Even as the White House released numerous cryptoasset reports today and Treasury called for action on several fronts, Sen. Warren (D-MA) demands more.

Daily091622.pdf

7 09, 2022

DAILY090722

2022-11-09T16:08:53-05:00September 7th, 2022|2- Daily Briefing|

Hsu Expands on Crypto, Climate, Merger, Systemic Actions

Acting Comptroller Hsu today made it clear that – contrary to assertions from Sen. Warren (D-MA) and others – his decision not to rescind prior OCC crypto charters and related rulings does not mean the agency is taking anything other than a cautious approach to cryptoassets.  He also indicated that the slow-down in interagency action is warranted as it gives officials time to understand recent shocks to this sector.

New Brainard Position Suggests Fed CBDC Thinking Advances

In addition to hawkish anti-inflation remarks, Fed Vice Chair Brainard today appeared to back away from her prior comments espousing an expansive view of how a U.S. CBDC might work (see Client Report CBDC13).  Now calling CBDC a “neutral settlement layer” affording additional stability and opposing a consumer-facing model.

Barr Takes Stage With Bold Plans For Capital, Resolution, Mergers

In his maiden speech today, Fed supervisory Vice Chair Michael Barr made several significant announcements.  Reiterating the support for holistic capital regulation noted during his confirmation, Mr. Barr confirmed that the Fed will undertake a sweeping review of standards to address unintended consequences without reducing capital requirements.  The Board will also begin action on the Basel “end-game” later this fall.

Daily090722.pdf

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