#liquidity

6 10, 2023

REFORM228

2023-10-06T11:45:12-04:00October 6th, 2023|5- Client Report|

FedFin Assessment: Basel Lays Big Plans for Basel V

As we noted yesterday, the Basel Committee’s October meeting concluded not only with plans for new disclosure consultations, but also a report on lessons learned from the 2023 crisis.  We have long considered the “end-game” standards so substantive as to constitute Basel IV; now, as this report details, Basel is laying plans for Basel V via new liquidity, interest-rate, capital, and structural changes to the current construct.  We thus focus on the supervisory and regulatory action steps Basel posits as necessary responses to the financial-market volatility sparked earlier this year by SVB, SBNY, FRC, and CS’s failures.  While Basel states that none of its recommendations necessarily presages near-term global standards, they warrant review not only as likely precursors to at least some new proposals, but also as guides to what is top of mind for national regulators beyond finalizing end-game capital rules and dealing with home-country matters such as resolvability.  If Basel proposes only some of the regulatory revisions it has in mind or, as the Fed clearly intends, the U.S. does so ahead of time, larger banks will face significant revisions to the LCR and NSFR, capital add-ons for interest-rate outliers, and express ring-fencing to prevent a CS repeat – i.e., a case in which the parent company met applicable standards but key subsidiaries fell far short.

REFORM228.pdf

29 09, 2023

M092923

2023-09-29T11:41:36-04:00September 29th, 2023|6- Client Memo|

How a Shut-Down Stokes Systemic Risk

Although there’s been some talk of what a government shut-down does to the SEC, there’s lots, lots more to worry about.  Risks are out there, risks that should be taken very, very seriously by the Members of Congress who seem to think that more chaos stokes their political fortunes.  Perhaps it does, but it could well do a lot of damage to their finances, not to mention those of all the voters who might well bear a reasonable grudge.

M092923.pdf

29 09, 2023

Karen Petrou: How a Shut-Down Stokes Systemic Risk

2023-09-29T11:41:22-04:00September 29th, 2023|The Vault|

Although there’s been some talk of what a government shut-down does to the SEC, there’s lots, lots more to worry about.  Risks are out there, risks that should be taken very, very seriously by the Members of Congress who seem to think that more chaos stokes their political fortunes.  Perhaps it does, but it could well do a lot of damage to their finances, not to mention those of all the voters who might well bear a reasonable grudge.

Where’s the systemic scary place?  Or, better said, places?  Some are right in front of us; others lurk in the closet waiting to pounce.

What worries me the most in the immediate future is the ability of bad actors to exploit what could be lightly- or even unguarded portals into critical financial market infrastructure.  There are of course many, many bad actors out there with the sophistication and/or state sponsorship quickly to test and then attack critical points in the payment, settlement, and clearing systems and/or the grids on which they rely.

As I discussed on Tuesday, not all providers of critical financial market infrastructure are under the hopefully-eagle eyes of the federal banking agencies which, funded outside federal appropriations, will remain open.  Some fall under the SEC or CFTC, agencies that will be hobbled, and some critical providers are wholly outside the regulatory perimeter.  Even if their nodes of market access seem small, disruption has a bad habit of migrating at lightning speed.  Even if power outages are …

21 09, 2023

DAILY092123

2023-09-21T16:52:36-04:00September 21st, 2023|2- Daily Briefing|

Hill Stands by Opposition to Pending Rules, Presses for Holistic Liquidity Approach

Reflecting his votes on all of the recent proposals, FDIC Vice Chairman Hill today criticized recent rulemakings as an overreaction to March bank failures and urged regulators to carefully consider the proposals’ aggregate effects amid uncertain economic conditions.  Although he reiterated his general support for the LTD proposal (see FSM Report TLAC9), Mr. Hill argued that the FDIC should focus more on regional bank resolvability via a weekend sale.  He also pushed for a more holistic approach to liquidity requirements, arguing that they should be more durable for a wider range of stress events and better reflect bank behavior in times of stress.

Daily092123.pdf

19 09, 2023

DAILY091923

2023-09-19T18:11:29-04:00September 19th, 2023|2- Daily Briefing|

FSB Finally Takes Concrete CCP-Resolution Action

Following longstanding announcements that it would advance CCP resolvability, the FSB today released a consultative report recommending a toolbox approach to CCP resolution providing sufficient loss absorption and liquidity that is readily available and mitigates adverse effects on financial stability.

Treasury Advances Climate-Risk Principles, Not Mandates

Cautiously advancing the President’s climate-risk order (see FSM Report GREEN8), Treasury today released nine nonbinding principles for net-zero financing and investment encouraging financial institutions to focus on limiting scope 3 emissions by implementing robust net-zero transition plans.

CFPB Expands AI Crackdown

Expanding on last year’s adverse action guidance (see FSM Report FAIRLEND11), the CFPB today issued a circular stating that lenders – especially those using AI – cannot use CFPB sample adverse actions forms and checklists to deny consumers credit if the samples do not accurately portray the reasoning behind the denial.

HFSC Republicans Expand Attack From Capital to LTD Rules

Today’s HFSC Financial Institutions Subcommittee hearing on the economic consequences of the banking agencies’ slate of recent proposals showcased strong Republican concerns.

Daily091923.pdf

12 09, 2023

DAILY091223

2023-09-12T17:19:22-04:00September 12th, 2023|2- Daily Briefing|

GHOS Presses Basel Action on Lessons Learned

Basel’s group of Governors and Heads of Supervision (GHOS) met yesterday, listing strong bank risk management and governance arrangements, effective supervision, and the need for a robust regulatory framework as the primary lessons it learned from this year’s banking turmoil.  GHOS also pressed its members to finalize their Basel III reforms, noting that most plan to implement them by the end of 2024.

Gensler Takes Swing-Pricing, AI Fire

At today’s Senate Banking hearing with SEC Chairman Gensler, Democrats largely defended the pace and scope of recent SEC work while Republicans criticized the agency for rulemakings they said were ideologically driven and inadequately analyzed.  Chairman Brown (D-OH) applauded the SEC’s crypto enforcement actions and encouraged it to examine broker and investment adviser use of AI.  Ranking Member Scott (R-SC) and several other Republicans sharply criticized Mr. Gensler for what they said was his lack of transparency and responsiveness to congressional inquiries.

Daily091223.pdf

8 09, 2023

DAILY090823

2023-09-08T16:06:25-04:00September 8th, 2023|2- Daily Briefing|

Barr Backs Away from CBDC, Stands Firm vs. Stablecoins

FRB Vice Chair Barr today for the first time sided firmly with Chair Powell in approaching CBDCs with caution, if at all.  Mr. Barr also emphasized not only that the Fed will not proceed with a CBDC without Executive Branch approval, but also now says that it would require “authorizing legislation,” not just Congressional “approval.”

Examining CBDC and Wholesale Payments

The FDIC today released an internal – but not necessarily independent – review of First Republic’s failure, largely saying that FDIC supervisory staff could have done better identifying emerging risks without strongly criticizing actions ahead of the bank’s collapse.  This is blamed on factors evident at the time: e.g., rapid growth, poor liquidity and interest-rate risk management.

Fed Study: CBDC Unnecessary for Successful Wholesale Tokenization

As JPMorgan and other companies continue to advance wholesale digital payments and Chair Powell has suggested (see Client Report FEDERALRESERVE73) that he may be open to wholesale CBDC, a new Fed staff study finds that tokenized wholesale payment systems do not require a new form of central-bank money.

Daily090823.pdf

22 08, 2023

FedFin on: GSIB Surcharge

2023-08-23T10:19:58-04:00August 22nd, 2023|The Vault|

As anticipated in the wake of recent bank failures, the FRB has proposed a significant revision to the current rules calculating systemic-risk scores that lead to GSIB designation.  These indicators are used not only for GSIB designation or a higher surcharge, but also for categorizing U.S. and foreign banks for other purposes and thus would also bring some banking organizations into categories subject to very strict prudential standards.  The Board estimates that the overall impact of the changes to the surcharge and risk-scoring methodology are small and, regardless, warranted to enhance systemic resilience and consistency.  It also estimates that the interaction of this new approach with certain liquidity and TLAC standards is generally minimal.  However, the Fed has not assessed the relationship of scoring revisions to one way to calculate the GSIB charges, nor does the Board assess the cumulative impact of all of the changes proposed here in concert with its sweeping revisions to U.S. capital rules for all banking organizations with assets over $100 billion.  It is also unclear how these changes in concert with all the others interact with the stress capital buffer applicable to large U.S.-domiciled banking organizations…

The full report is available to retainer clients. To find out how you can sign up for the service, click here and here.…

22 08, 2023

GSIB22

2023-08-22T10:19:26-04:00August 22nd, 2023|1- Financial Services Management|

GSIB Surcharge

As anticipated in the wake of recent bank failures, the FRB has proposed a significant revision to the current rules calculating systemic-risk scores that lead to GSIB designation.  These indicators are used not only for GSIB designation or a higher surcharge, but also for categorizing U.S. and foreign banks for other purposes and thus would also bring some banking organizations into categories subject to very strict prudential standards.  The Board estimates that the overall impact of the changes to the surcharge and risk-scoring methodology are small and, regardless, warranted to enhance systemic resilience and consistency.  It also estimates that the interaction of this new approach with certain liquidity and TLAC standards is generally minimal.  However, the Fed has not assessed the relationship of scoring revisions to one way to calculate the GSIB charges, nor does the Board assess the cumulative impact of all of the changes proposed here in concert with its sweeping revisions to U.S. capital rules for all banking organizations with assets over $100 billion.  It is also unclear how these changes in concert with all the others interact with the stress capital buffer applicable to large U.S.-domiciled banking organizations.  Despite the Fed’s conclusions, it seems likely that the total impact will be considerable in light of methodological problems in this proposal as well as those FedFin identified with the impact analysis for the capital rewrite.

GSIB22.pdf

14 08, 2023

DAILY081423

2023-08-14T16:36:42-04:00August 14th, 2023|2- Daily Briefing|

FDIC Finds Banks Well-Capitalized, Resilient

Today’s FDIC 2023 Risk Review concludes that banks were well capitalized as of Q1 2023 and have demonstrated resilience through weaker economic conditions, rising interest rates, high inflation, and this year’s financial turmoil even though industry performance moderated from 2022.  Key risks on which the FDIC will focus include liquidity risks as well as the effects of bank failures on overall banking conditions and stability.

FDIC Plans Major Resolution, Insurance Rewrite

As anticipated, FDIC Chair Gruenberg’s speech today confirms that his agency and the Fed will soon propose a TLAC framework for regional banks akin to the long-term debt TLAC standards imposed on GSIBs (see FSM Report RESOLVE48).  Mr. Gruenberg also indicated that the FDIC will soon propose a new version of its 2011 IDI resolution rules (see FSM Report LIVINGWILL8).

Daily081423.pdf

Go to Top