#operational risk

9 01, 2024

DAILY010924

2024-01-09T16:48:15-05:00January 9th, 2024|2- Daily Briefing|

Bowman Now Tackles Supervisory Transparency

In remarks late yesterday, FRB Gov. Bowman added a new concern: supervisory transparency.  She indicated that the Fed’s supervisory expectations have changed to the point at which some state agencies think the Fed goes too far, but banks have no way of anticipating possible supervisory injunctions.  As a result, she argues for near-term transparency via public notice-and-comment guidance or rulemaking.

Barr Bows a Bit

Answering questions today, FRB Vice Chair Barr indicated that the BTFP may well close on March 11, emphasizing the importance of adhering to the Fed’s emergency-liquidity mandate.  That said, loans will be extended until the one-year anniversary and may remain until 2025.  He also outlined a significant compromise on the operational-risk section of the end-game rules (see FSM Report OPSRISK22), more closely aligning the proposal with the Basel standards as our outlook anticipated.

Daily010924.pdf

27 11, 2023

GSE-112723

2023-11-27T11:49:59-05:00November 27th, 2023|4- GSE Activity Report|

An Advanced View of Regulatory Capital?

The most significant thing in FHFA’s final capital rule is not what is to be done, but what FHFA left out: ending the GSEs’ advanced-approach requirement.  As a result, Fannie and Freddie can still use models for key calculations, a requirement that makes more sense for two complex organizations than it did for the regional banks also long subject to advanced-approach requirements even though the rules required them, like GSIBs, to hold the higher of the standardized or advanced approach.

GSE-112723.pdf

24 10, 2023

DAILY102423

2023-10-24T17:18:54-04:00October 24th, 2023|2- Daily Briefing|

McHenry, Barr Blast Basel Adherence in End-Game Regs

Although today’s hearing challenging regulatory actions aligned with global regulators was postponed, HFSC Chairman McHenry (R-NC) and Financial Institutions Subcommittee Chairman Barr (R-KY) today kept up the pressure, releasing a letter to the GAO commissioning a study of the end-game rules.

New CRA Reg Sets Controversial, Complex Standards

Leading the way to certain inter-agency approval, the Federal Reserve today voted 6-1 to approve a final version of their 2022 controversial proposal (see FSM Report CRA32).

FDIC OIG: Supervisors Missed So Much, Acted So Slowly re SBNY

The FDIC’s OIG report today on SBNY’s failure follows much of the line the Fed’s OIG took when it came on the material-loss review of SVB’s collapse.

House Republicans Pressure Biden on $6 Billion Iran Ransom

Although HFSC continues to cancel all its hearings as the speakership battle continues, its Oversight Subcommittee today optimistically released a memo outlining goals for Thursday’s Iran-sanctions hearing.

Treasury Presses CSPs to Negotiate With Banks

Treasury Assistant Secretary for Financial Institutions Graham Steele today highlighted Treasury’s work with cloud service providers (CSPs) to improve transparency and security.

Divided FDIC Advances CRA Rewrite, Climate-Risk Principles

As anticipated, the FDIC on a 3-2 vote joined the Fed in approving a 1400+ page final CRA rule.

Daily102423.pdf

5 10, 2023

DAILY100523

2023-10-05T16:36:40-04:00October 5th, 2023|2- Daily Briefing|

Kanter, Khan Mount Stout Defense of Draft Merger Guidelines

FTC Chair Khan and DOJ Assistant AG Kanter today defended the agencies’ draft merger guidelines (see FSM Report MERGER12) on grounds that they are faithful to congressional intent, reflect core legal principles, are more accessible and easier to apply, and better reflect the modern competitive landscape.

Basel Plans NBFI Ops-Risk Supervisory Standards, Continuing Review of Bank Supervision, New Disclosures

The Basel Committee today released its long-awaited report on 2023 vulnerabilities, deciding based on it to prioritize new supervisory approaches and additional analytical tools.

Bipartisan Bill Provides Transaction Account Deposit Insurance

Following Chairman Gruenberg’s remarks yesterday highlighting targeted deposit insurance reform, Sens. Manchin (D-WV), Braun (R-SD), and Hickenlooper (D-CO) yesterday introduced legislation to reinstate the Transaction Account Guarantee (TAG) program, expanding deposit insurance to non-interest bearing transaction accounts up to $10 million.

FDIC Proposes Public-Good Policy for IDI Corporate Governance

The FDIC today announced the Board’s 3-2 approval of an NPR establishing guidelines on corporate governance and risk management for FDIC-supervised IDIs with over $10 billion in assets.

Daily100523.pdf

4 10, 2023

DAILY100423

2023-10-04T16:40:00-04:00October 4th, 2023|2- Daily Briefing|

Bowman Unbending in Demands for Better Reg Analytics, Community-Bank Mergers

In what might have been only perfunctory introductory remarks, FRB Gov. Bowman today instead continued her all-out campaign to force far more independent research before the Fed finalizes pending rules.

Brown Asks for No Wells Fargo Mercy

Senate Banking Chairman Brown (D-OH) today sent a letter to FRB Vice Chair Barr and OCC Acting Comptroller Hsu taking serious issue with what he calls unfair labor relations practices, consumer abuses, and compliance failures at Wells Fargo, urging the regulators to take stronger action to change the bank’s culture.

McKernan Counters Gruenberg on Endgame’s Nonbank Effects

Fleshing out official comments made in dissent against pending rules, FDIC Board member Jonathan McKernan today countered Chair Gruenberg’s recent comments that any migration of bank activities to nonbanks due to the capital rules should not be considered in the regulatory process.

Gruenberg Reiterates His Top Risk Worries

As with Gov. Bowman earlier today, FDIC Chair Gruenberg used his remarks later in the day to emphasize continuing concerns: in this case, uninsured deposits, maturity mismatches, and rapid growth.

Daily100423.pdf

3 10, 2023

DAILY100323

2023-10-03T16:38:58-04:00October 3rd, 2023|2- Daily Briefing|

Hsu Notes Benefits of International Data Hub, Warns of Nonbank Risks

In remarks today, Acting Comptroller Hsu focused on the benefits of the BIS International Data Hub, noting for example that it provides national authorities with a horizontal view of key risks affecting the global financial system difficult to obtain elsewhere.

Basel Sees End-Game in Sight, US Off Late List

Finally taking the U.S. off the tardy list, the Basel Committee today updated its Basel III implementation dashboard, finding that as of Q3 2023 the US, along with the EU, UK, China, Switzerland, South Africa, and Hong Kong are now working to adopt revisions to the credit valuation adjustment and operational risk frameworks, the standardized approach for credit risk, the minimum requirements for market risk, and the output floor – i.e., Basel’s end-game.

Daily100323.pdf

25 09, 2023

m092523

2023-09-25T09:26:11-04:00September 25th, 2023|6- Client Memo|

How to Right the Raft of New Rules

What struck me most about the HFSC hearing at which I testified last week was how lukewarm Democrats are to the new rules unless they feel compelled to defend the White House or core political objectives.  When the partisan spotlight dimmed, more than a few Democrats said that the rules might have both small and even significant perverse consequences. Given that GOP-led repeal of the rules is impossible and court overturn is at best a lengthy process, hard work to get the rules more to the middle is essential.  Even if large banks still think the rules are bad, they’ll be better and that’s all to the good.

m092523.pdf

18 08, 2023

Al082123

2023-08-22T09:52:13-04:00August 18th, 2023|3- This Week|

Capital Regulation Deconstructed

Last week, we provided clients with several more in-depth analyses of the interagency capital proposal.  Of particular note is our wrap-up report (see Client Report CAPITAL234) which looks hard at the agencies’ own quantitative and qualitative impact assessments to see what the raw numbers say, how the numbers comport with current data and market realities, and – most importantly – how to interpret the agencies’ qualitative conclusions in light of these analytics, as well as our understanding of many of the studies on which key assumptions are premised.  As the report details, we agree that the agencies’ rationale for every possible capital woe – that anything is better than a financial crisis – is right.  But it’s only right if the result of the rules is to make financial crises less likely and that, as our reports make clear, is far from assured.  Many provisions of each key section combined with overall quantitative results could well prove profoundly destabilizing.

Al082123.pdf

14 08, 2023

M081423

2023-08-14T10:41:39-04:00August 14th, 2023|6- Client Memo|

Why The Operational-Risk Capital Rules Make No Sense

While there are many risks for which regulatory capital is a vital panacea, operational risk is not among them.  The proposed approach to these capital standards makes it still more clear that regulators don’t trust themselves or banks and thus deploy the only tool they seem to know – ever-higher capital – no matter the cost and, more important, the risk.  In fact, the best way to address operational risk is to spend money, not put it in a capital piggybank regulators can shake to hear coins rattle when they worry even though getting the coins out in a hurry will prove devilishly difficult.

M081423.pdf

14 08, 2023

Karen Petrou: Why The Operational-Risk Capital Rules Make No Sense

2023-08-14T10:41:30-04:00August 14th, 2023|The Vault|

While there are many risks for which regulatory capital is a vital panacea, operational risk is not among them.  The proposed approach to these capital standards makes it still more clear that regulators don’t trust themselves or banks and thus deploy the only tool they seem to know – ever-higher capital – no matter the cost and, more important, the risk.  In fact, the best way to address operational risk is to spend money, not put it in a capital piggybank regulators can shake to hear coins rattle when they worry even though getting the coins out in a hurry will prove devilishly difficult.

The reason why regulatory capital doesn’t do diddly for operational-risk absorption is self-evident when one understands what constitutes operational risk.  It’s essentially what God does to banks (natural disasters), what people do to banks (fraud), and what banks do to themselves (fragile systems) and to others (endangering consumers or markets at ultimate legal cost).

None of these risks is meaningfully reduced with more capital and, even if it were, the way the new rules work frustrates the way it might.  As our in-depth analysis of the proposed operational risk-based capital (ORBC) rules makes clear, regulators want banks to look back as long as ten years to see how many operational losses they booked, measure business volume over the past three years, ramp up these sums via mysterious “scaling factors,” and then somehow discern what operational risk will be in coming years and how much shareholder …

Go to Top